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Adaptive Behavior and Its Measurement Implications for the Field of Mental Retardation

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Published by American Association .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Mental Illness,
  • Reference,
  • Psychology,
  • Adaptability (Psychology),
  • Diagnosis,
  • Mental retardation,
  • People with mental disabilitie,
  • People with mental disabilities,
  • Psychological testing,
  • Testing

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsRobert L. Schalock (Editor), David L. Braddock (Editor)
The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages227
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL11539632M
ISBN 100940898640
ISBN 109780940898646

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In the DSM‐IV, adaptive behavior is a diagnostic requirement but the measurement of the construct is only briefly discussed, whereas the AAMR definition puts a greater weight on the adaptive behavior component and specifically requires the use of assessment scales standardized on both persons with and without disabilities (Luckasson et al Cited by:   Abstract. Measurement of adaptive behavior has its roots in the identification of what we now call intellectual disabilities. Currently, adaptive behaviors are viewed as multidimensional and include social, practical and conceptual skills as they occur in the individual’s natural : Pegeen Cronin, B. J. Freeman. ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xviii, pages: illustrations ; 24 cm: Contents: The Concept of Adaptive Behavior --Adaptive Behavior: A Historical Overview / Kazuo Nihira --Adaptive Behavior Prior to the s --Adaptive Behavior During the s --Adaptive Behavior During the s --Adaptive Behavior During the s . the current approaches to its measurement, four assessment issues and challenges related to the use of adaptive behavior information for the diagnosis of intellectual disability, and two future issues regarding the relations of adaptive behavior to multidimensional models of personal competence and the distribution of adaptive behavior scores.

  The construct of adaptive behavior: Its conceptualization, measurement, and use in the field of intellectual disability. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, (4), –Author: Esther Hong, Johnny L. Matson. A Historical Overview of Adaptive Behavior. Current Trends in Adaptive Behavior Research. Future Research Issues and Directions. Implications for the Field of Intellectual Disabilities. Conclusion. ReferencesCited by: 4. Introduction. Adaptive behavior is the performance of daily activities required for personal and social self sufficiency across a variety of life situations including self care (e.g. dressing and bathing), community mobility, home maintenance, establishing and maintaining relationships, and communicating needs and feelings (Sparrow, Cicchetti, & Balla, ).Cited by: Adaptive behavior has been an integral, although sometimes unstated, part of the long history of mental retardation and its definition. In the 19th century, mental retardation was recognized principally in terms of a number of factors that included awareness and understanding of surroundings, ability to engage in regular economic and social life, dependence on others, the .

Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale: Application of Item Response Theory to the Assessment of Adaptive Behavior. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, , Publisher Summary. Communication is a skill that influences the adaptive ability of an individual in every facet of life. The Adaptive Behavior Assessment System-II (ABAS-II) is designed to provide a comprehensive assessment of adaptive functioning and an assessment of the degree to which individuals, ages 0–89, independently display functional skills in everyday living. Adaptive behavior refers to behavior that enables a person (usually used in the context of children) to get along in his or her environment with greatest success and least conflict with others. This is a term used in the areas of psychology and special education. Adaptive behavior relates to every day skills or tasks that the "average" person is able to complete, similar to the . Adaptive behavior has been an integral, although sometimes unstated, part of the long history of mental retardation and its definition. In the 19th century, mental retardation was recognized principally in terms of a number of factors that included awareness and understanding of surroundings, ability to engage in regular economic and social life, dependence on others, the Cited by: 1.